Emergency Rooms Are Parking Lots For Non-Urgent Patients According To Dr. Eric Forsthoefel

Emergency rooms are turning into family care centers, according to a study sponsored by NPR, the Robert Woods Foundation, and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Patients know they can get treatment regardless of their social status or ability to pay. Plus, thousands of people don’t have a family health care provider they see on a regular basis so they go to the emergency room for treatment. According to a 2016 study, four out of ten people who visit an emergency room need non-urgent care. There’s not much hospitals can do to alleviate this non-urgent healthcare trend, according to a recent report by an NPR affiliate in Florida. Thanks to the 1986 Emergency Medical Treatment and Active Labor Act, hospitals have to provide medical services to anyone who needs care even if they don’t have any type of health insurance. Plus, hospitals can’t turn people away from emergency room treatments because of their legal status or their social class.

WMFE, the NPR affiliate, put the emergency room story together in Florida. Health news reporter, Abe Aboraya interviewed emergency room physicians in order to hear what they had to say about emergency room overcrowding due to treating non-urgent care patients. One of the first doctors Aboraya interviewed was Dr. Eric Forsthoefel. Aboraya wanted to pick Forsthoefel’s mind in order to find out how overcrowding impacts proper medical care. Dr. Forsthoefel is a six-year emergency room veteran. Forsthoefel got his medical degree from Louisiana State University School of Medicine. He also did his emergency room resident training there. Dr. Forsthoefel holds a Florida and Louisiana emergency room medical license, but he works in Tallahassee now.

Crowding and care delays are part of Dr. Forsthoefel day, every day. Non-urgent care has increased to epidemic proportions, according to the NPR report. Dr. Forsthoefel and his team are knee-deep in that epidemic. According to Forsthoefel, Florida’s emergency room issues mirror other the issues emergency rooms around the country experience. Only 50 percent of the patients Forsthoefel treats get admitted for further in-patient treatments. About 30 percent of his emergency room patients are acute visits, and more than ten percent are non-urgent outpatient visits. Some doctors call emergency rooms “safety nets” for good reasons. Emergency rooms are safe havens, and they are a place where patients know they will get some kind of help even if it’s a short-term fix.

Dr. Forsthoefel said emergency room costs continue to escalate. Plus, finding the right fit in terms of a nursing and administration staff can be a challenge. Some medical staffers are not willing to put in the time and the energy to face the volume of non-urgent patients every day. Plus, managing this healthcare crisis is not easy. Emergency rooms need constant doctor and nurse attention as well as enough resources to give the emergency room staff the tools they need to provide up-to-date medical procedures. Hospitals and emergency room doctors know non-urgent emergency room care will continue to increase even though there’s not enough room or staff to treat them properly.

https://www.linkedin.com/in/eric-forsthoefel/

DR. Saad Saad Is An Inspiration To Many People Who Hope To Accomplish Their Goals And Dreams

Dr. Saad Saad is a pediatric surgeon who has been working for most of his life to improve the tools and methods that his sector employs. He was born in Palestine during a time when the region was in turmoil. After the State of Israel’s creation, his family was forced to find a new home. That home ended up being in Kuwait, and it was their that he discovered his lifelong passion to serve as a surgeon. The area he lived in was very hot, and people there had two choices; work outside in the hot sun or get an education so they could work inside under air conditioning. Dr. Saad Saad ended up choosing the latter of these two, and his father supported his choice.

 

Dr. Saad Saad set out to get his education and ended up graduating from medical school, with honors. He learned, back then, to never wait for another day to get something done that he could do in the moment, and he still follows this rule. This has led him to maintaining an impeccable work ethic, and he quickly became a US Board Certified pediatric surgeon after coming to the country. Because he could speak, both, English and Arabic fluently, he was chosen to serve as the pediatric surgeon for the Saudi Royal Family during the mid 1980s. He was honored and took the position and served the family as their pediatric surgeon until 1989.

 

When Dr. Saad Saad came back to the U.S.A., he got to work on minimizing the pain as well the recovery time of the people that came to him for their surgical needs. It was him who created a procedure that eliminates the need to make a second incision on a the body of a child during surgeries. The motivation to create this procedure was born out of his compassion children. Thousands of children, now, have him to thank because they do not have to endure the pain of a second incision.

 

During an interview, Dr. Saad Saad was asked what advice he might offer his younger self. He commented that he would tell himself that it is not impossible to reach the goals that we set for ourselves. This is akin to the American saying that anything is possible if we set our mind to the task. The doctor is a strong believer in this sentiment and believes that a person from any background can achieve great things when they focus and work hard for it. He has been a source of inspiration and motivation for many people who are hoping to overcome their own struggles, and many of his innovations in the surgery industry are still being used to this day. Learn more : https://about.me/ssaad/getstarted